Research indicates that women who graduate from single-sex schools are better positioned to excel in higher-level education. The BELA school model is enhanced by research and connects theory and practice. The following reports highlight the benefits of an all-girls education and how we can rethink schooling for young women.

 

Black girls matter: pushed out, overpoliced and underprotected - kimberle williams crenshaw

The research in Black Girls Matter: Pushed Out, Overpoliced and Underprotected documents the experiences that young women of color are having in school and challenges fellow researchers and policy makers to look at youth crisis from the perspective of a girl of color. Researcher Kimberle Crenshaw says, ‘Because detachment from school carries so many negative consequences, efforts to reverse these patterns must be informed by a closer look at how girls experience the push and pull factors that shape their attachment to school.’

Participants in the study indicated that zero-tolerance schools hindered their learning experience, mostly because they would become disengaged from the learning process and not feel attached to the learning environment. It was noted that when discipline is overemphasized, girls who struggle with trauma and other unmet needs may only come to the attention of school staff when their behavior leads to punishable offenses. Also, identifying trauma and victimization early is imperative for school success. The recommendations from this study are reflected in BELA’s school model. Please further explore the research by reading: Black Girls Matter

Women Graduates of Single-Sex and Coeducational HSchool: Differences in their characteristics and the transition to college –Linda Sax

The data that informed the research in, Women Graduates of Single-Sex and Coeducational High School: Differences in their characteristics and the transition to college, was collected by the UCLA’s Higher Education Research Institute comparing the ‘backgrounds, behaviors, attitudes, and aspirations’ of a cohort of 6,552 women graduates from single sex schools to a cohort of 14,684 women graduates of co-educational schools.

The findings highlighted that women who graduate from single-sex schools arrive at college with greater confidence in their mathematics and computer abilities and are more likely to pursue an engineering degree. Also, women graduates of single sex schools exhibit higher levels of academic engagement and community involvement when compared to their male peers. They also demonstrated higher levels of academic self-confidence.

Particular to secondary schooling, principal investigator Linda Sax, Ph.D. says, ‘All-girls schools appear to produce graduates who enter college more academically and politically engaged.’ To further explore this research, please read: Graduates of single-sex schools.

When Girls Don’t Graduate We All Fail, A Call to Improve High School Graduation Rates for Girls – National Women’s Law Center

The National Women’s Law Center calls attention to the increased high school drop-out rates of girls, especially girls of color. The study, When Girls Don’t Graduate We All Fail, A Call to Improve High School Graduation Rates for Girls, states that ‘recent statistics show that overall, an estimated one in four female students will not graduate with a regular high school diploma in the standard, four-year time period’. It was reported in the study that the income gap between dropouts and high school graduates is greater for women than it is for men.

When compared to their male peers, girls who fail to graduate from high school have higher rates of unemployment, make significantly lower wages, and are more likely to rely on public support programs to provide for their families. When a girl drops out of high school, it is of critical socioeconomic concern. To further explore this research, please read: Graduation rates for girls.


National Coalition of Girls’ Schools

The National Coalition of Girls’ Schools (NCGS) is a leading advocate for girls’ education with a distinct commitment to the transformative power of all-girls schools. NCGS is collaborating and connecting with schools, organizations, individuals and others that are dedicated to the influence of an all-girls education on a national level.

NCGS is servicing members by providing access to research that provides valuable data and analyses on trends in the field, as well as advocacy, networking opportunities and professional development. To learn more about NCGS, please visit their website: NCGS